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Battle of Cynocephalus

Battle of Cynocephalus

Regular price €169,00 EUR
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SKU:5EFA3EC9

WHY BUY

  • Magnificent and real colors
  • Make any room elegant
  • Perfect for a prestigious gift

CHARACTERISTICS

Print on handmade Amalfi paper
Sheet size: 30 x 42 cm
Material: artwork printed on precious handmade Amalfi paper with frayed edges

Print on handmade Amalfi paper with frame
Sheet size: 30 x 42 cm
Framed: 32 x 44 cm
Material: artwork printed on precious handmade Amalfi paper with frayed edges

Print on pictorial canvas
Size: 80 x 60 cm
Material: artwork printed on fine-grained pictorial canvas
Frame: Light brown beech wood and handmade wood pulp

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The artwork

The Battle of Cynocephalus, fought in 197 B.C. between Rome and the Macedonian Kingdom, was one of the most significant battles of the Second Macedonian War. Located in the hills of Cynocephalus in Thessaly, this battle saw the Roman consul Titus Quincius Flamininus confront the Macedonian army led by Philip V.

The importance of the Battle of Cynocephalus lies in several key factors. Strategically, it marked the end of Macedonian hegemony over Greece. The Roman forces, using more flexible and versatile tactics than the traditional Macedonian phalanx, managed to achieve a decisive victory. This demonstrated the superiority of the Roman legions over the rigid Macedonian formation.

Politically, the Roman victory consolidated Rome's influence in the Greek region. After the battle, Titus Quincius Flamininus proclaimed the freedom of the Greek cities, gaining the favor of the local population and establishing Rome as the leading power in the eastern Mediterranean.

Psychologically, the defeat significantly weakened Philip V's power, reducing his ability to resist Roman expansion. This battle was a turning point that accelerated the fall of Macedonia as a dominant power and paved the way for Rome's future expansion eastward.

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